NEW ZEALAND PREPPERS
From the beginning of mankinds time on earth, humans have tried to build homes that would keep their families safe. From caves to small huts to castles and underground bunkers, humans have continued to strive for safety.
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EMERGENCY TOILET
LEARNING HOW TO MAKE AN EMERGENCY TOILET
Once you begin to explore your options for emergency toilets, you will be surprised just how many choices are available to you. Some are much nicer than others. This is one of those items that it is okay to purchase, practice using, and then tuck away in the garage hoping that you will never have to use it. Bucket toilets are not my favorite option. They can be unstable for anyone who is larger or smaller than average, such as young children. However, one thing that I really like about bucket toilets is that they are a great place to store sanitation supplies so you have everything in one place. Bucket toilets are portable, which is a huge advantage if you need to evacuate. I do not like the smell and accumulation of excrement in the bucket. This can be minimized with the use of bag liners.

THE CAT HOLE TOILET
The Cathole Toilet
Dig a hole up to one metre deep and 30 – 40 cm wide. Make sure the hole is away from any water source, above the groundwater table and far away from any vegetable gardens. After each use, cover your poos and wees with soil or other mulch.
Keep the hole covered after each time you use it, for hygiene and safety reasons. You can do this by placing a piece of board or heavy-duty cardboard over the hole, this will discourage pests or pets from getting into the toilet. When your poos and wees get to 30cm below the surface - fill in the hole. Cover the hole with soil and dig yourself a new long–drop! This hole can also be used to hold solid waste from a bucket toilet.

THE LONG DROP TOILET
The Traditional Kiwi Long-Drop Toilet:
Most of us have used a longdrop toilet so you know what the general premise is. Essentially, dig a really deep, wide hole, build a privacy shed with a seat and place it over the hole. You can also put a bucket under the seat which can then be emptied periodically.
Longdrops are a tried and true way to manage a significant amount of waste, and while they still require a decent amount of work, they are relatively labor-free (once built) compared to some of these other options. They also do a better job of containing the unpleasant odor of human waste.

To extend the life of your outhouse if you use the bucket system avoid peeing in it. Save your crapper shed for number 2 uses only. Urine equals excess weight and volume that you can dispose safely.

COMPOSTING TOILET
Composting Toilet
A composting toilet is a simple waterless toilet system of mixing
human manure with a carbon material, such as sawdust, coconut
husks or coffee grounds, to encourage decomposition. It make a
compost material.

When set up properly, it doesn't smell. You can make a portable
composting toilet and turn human waste into compost. For an off-grid bugout location, or if you have an R.V., consider a composting toilet.


CAMPING TOILET
Camping Toilet :
A handy stand by for emergencies. Camping toilets can be bought relatively cheaply from many stores and online outlets. They can be used at home or even thrown into the back of the car if you need to evacuate. Keep a supplies of chemicals handy. Many campers use napisan in the toilet as a cheap alternative and is something many householders have anyway.

BUCKET TOILET
To make an emergency bucket toilet you will need:
Two sturdy 15 – 20-litre buckets with lids.
Dry mulch such as sawdust, dry leaves, soil or shredded newspaper.

With a permanent marker pen write "wees" on bucket 1 and "poos" on bucket 2. It is important that you try to keep your wees separate from your poos as it will help keep the smell down and make it safer.

Bucket 1 (wees): Add 2-3 cms of water to the bottom of your clean and empty bucket. Use bucket 1 for wees. Once you have finished close the lid and wash your hands! At the end of each day, dilute your wee with additional water and pour it into a disused area of your garden or other green space.

Bucket 2 (poos): Create a nest at the bottom of your clean and empty bucket. Use bucket 2 for poos and toilet paper only. When you have finished doing your business, add a large cup or handful of dry mulch (sawdust, straw, dry leaves, soil or shredded newspaper) to cover your poo. Then close the lid and wash your hands!

Bucket 2 will need to be emptied at least every three days. Empty into: a hole in the ground, as per the long-drop toilet for advice on building a suitable hole; or a large storage bin, such as a wheelie bin.

Help children learn to use an emergency bucket toilet:
Keep the gap between the toilet seat and the bucket as small as possible, to reduce accidents.
Ensure your usual toilet is sealed shut so it can’t be used.
For young children use symbols or paintings to help them learn which bucket is for poo and which bucket is for wee.

BASIC LONG-DROP TOILET (Cat hole toilet)
To make a basic long-drop toilet you will need:
Backyard or space on your property to dig a large hole.
Tools to dig a hole, such as a spade.
Soil or other fill such as straw, sawdust or shredded newspaper.

Dig a hole up to one metre deep and 30 – 40 cm wide. Make sure the hole is away from any water source, above the groundwater table and far away from any vegetable gardens. After each use, cover your poos and wees with soil or other mulch. Keep the hole covered after each time you use it, for hygiene and safety reasons. You can do this by placing a piece of board or heavy-duty cardboard over the hole, this will discourage pests or pets from getting into the toilet. When your poos and wees get to 30cm below the surface - fill in the hole. Cover the hole with soil and dig yourself a new long–drop! This hole can also be used to hold solid waste from a bucket toilet.

NEW ZEALAND DISASTER SURVIVAL GUIDE
Many families have had their lives changed forever by disasters in New Zealand in recent years. Having a survival plan could go a long way to helping your family during and after a disaster in New Zealand. Learn how to prepare your home and family for survival in a disaster in New Zealand.