NEW ZEALAND PREPPERS
DISASTER SURVIVAL GUIDE

BATTERY CARE
A good approach to take is to treat batteries and battery-powered devices like you do dairy products. Buy the freshest one whenever given the choice. A slightly older product is fine - particularly if you're offered an outstanding discount - but expect it to expire sooner.Steer clear of anything with questionable origin. And avoid buying something that you only expect to use a long time from now.
Li-ion BATTERIES
Here are a few things you can do to make your lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries last longer, whether they be used in an electric car, a large home installation - such as Tesla's newly announced Powerwall - or in your portable device, such as a smartphone or laptop. These tips will focus primarily on extending the lifespan of Li-ion batteries, so they don't need to be replaced as often. But if you are looking to maximise running time just for this very moment, possibly at the expense of having to replace the battery earlier, there are some added tips at the end.
KEEPING COOL
The most important influence on battery life is temperature. Li-ion batteries are typically happiest at around room temperature of 20 to 25°C. In warmer temperatures, a protective layer inside the batteries breaks and needs to be reconstituted, which sucks up some of the energy capacity the battery has to offer. And in colder temperatures the chemical reactions inside the battery slow down. However cold is usually less harmful than heat. So if you have the choice between placing your phone in the sun or the shade, the latter is probably preferable.
USE IT OR LOSE IT
It is important to remember that batteries degrade not only during use, but also when sitting idly on a shelf. This is one reason why most manufacturers specify not only a cycle life but also a calendar life for their batteries. So a good approach to take is to treat batteries and battery-powered devices like you do dairy products. Buy the freshest one whenever given the choice. A slightly older product is fine - particularly if you're offered an outstanding discount - but expect it to expire sooner.
NO MORE MEMORIES
The third tip relates to when and by how much batteries should be charged. One of the more widely known aspects about battery life is the "memory effect". In older rechargeable battery chemistries, such as nickel cadmium, partial charging and discharging significantly decreases the energy capacity. What is less known is that the memory effect in lithium-ion batteries, if it exists, tends to be very small. Instead, they have quite nuanced characteristics. When not in use, batteries degrade most when fully charged. So if left for several days or weeks without use, they should ideally be kept at a relatively low charging state, e.g around 20 per cent charged. Conversely, when being charged and discharged a lot, it is best to keep the batteries as close to the 50 per cent mark as possible. So if you are only charging and discharging batteries a bit at a time, it is much better to do this between 45-55 per cent than between 90-100 per cent.
Disclaimer:
Li-ion is not a single chemistry, but a range of chemistries. The above is intended as rough guide for iron-phosphate or cobalt-based cathode chemistries, which tend to be the most widely used. However, there are others including manganese-spinel which have slightly different characteristics. If in any doubt, ask the battery manufacturer for guidance.
Twizel New Zealand
Twizel New Zealand
Twizel New Zealand
Twizel New Zealand
Twizel New Zealand
Twizel New Zealand
Twizel New Zealand
New Zealand Disaster Survival Guide!
Is your family prepared for survival in a disaster. Having a survival kit containing important documents and supplies could go a long way to helping your family survive a disaster.
Twizel New Zealand